I Don’t Do That Podcast (With Ocho)

I Don't Do That (with Ocho)
E10 – I Don't Play Sports (Molly)
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Show Notes

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[theme music plays] “na na na na na yeah nah I don’t do that, no I don’t do that.  You know it’s alright; you can ask, but I don’t do that, no I don’t do that.  I don’t do that.  I don’t do that.

Ocho:

Episode 10

Molly:

 Balls. I don’t know. Balls always scared me.  like, throw basketball at me, and I’d be like, “no!”

Ocho:

Episode 10 is “I Don’t Play Sports.”  We’re talking with Molly today who does not play sports.  Molly is a White woman in her mid 30s.  She works in Minneapolis, MN, teaching adult tap dance at Ballare Teatro, and adult beginner flamenco dance with Zorongo Flamenco.  She is also a new mother to baby William, who is with us in the studio today.

Ocho:

Well, thanks for coming into the studio, Molly. Yeah.  And bring in your baby. Is this his first podcast then?

Molly:

I’m sure it is. 

Ocho:

It’s our first time having a baby on. So we’re here to talk about how you don’t play sports.

Molly:

Yes. 

Ocho:

Okay. Are there any exceptions right now, or is, is, is there anything that you do that could be considered a sport that you’d be down for? 

Molly:

I guess it depends on what people think of as a sport. So, 

Ocho: Like, like I don’t play sports, but people still assume that I’ll like, go bowling with them or go fishing or like maybe play pool.

Molly:

Yeah. I’ll play pool or go bowling. Okay. Or do yard games. I think of them as games. 

Ocho:

Games, yeah. So would you play like horseshoes or,

Molly:

Yeah. Yeah. My dad had horse shoe pits in the backyard. 

Yeah, for sure. 

Ocho:

Are you from North Dakota too? Yeah. It’s, it seems like a North Dakota thing maybe.

Molly:

Prob probably is. 

Ocho:

My mom’s family is from there and they, they played horseshoes. That’s like the first time I saw it, you know? 

Molly:

Yeah. Easy to set up. Just need: Horseshoes. 

Ocho:

Right, right. And I guess those used to be common or whatever…we had horseshoes a lot back in the day, so yeah. Fishing? You do that or?

Molly:

I’m not a fisherman or…

Ocho:

No, no, not into that. Really. So there’s a few things. Bowling, did we say that? Do you do that? 

Molly:

Yeah. Okay. I would bowl, I would go bowling, but just for fun. Yeah. 

Ocho:

So none of those things would you do maybe competitively? 

Molly:

No, I don’t think I would ever join a league or…

Ocho:

Right. Yeah. So what, what’s your history with sports then?

Molly:

I guess I just, I never tried them, even as a kid. Yeah. The only exception would be like if they forced us to play something in gym class, cuz you had to do that. So like, if I had had to for a grade. Like we would play volleyball and I would play, but I wouldn’t be excited about it. and I would not join the, the, the teams even if they really needed someone on the team. Like my school was very small. And so I. think they could have really used me on the team cuz there were maybe five other people. Five other people in my grade. To play like on the girls basketball team. For example. So they could have used that sixth person, but I just refused to do it. Cuz I just thought, “I don’t play sports. 

I don’t do that.”

Ocho:

Yeah, you don’t do that. Yeah. It’s the name of the show. Exactly. And that seems to be, maybe the crux of the story is that there was times when they needed you 

Molly:

Yeah.

Ocho:

And that you, you wouldn’t do it.  

Molly:

No.  Right. I would go watch, but I wouldn’t play. 

Ocho:

So how many people were in your school then? 

Molly:

I think a, I wanna say there was 11 people total in, in elementary school. 

Ocho:

In your elementary school? 

Molly:

In my grade. In my grade, yes. 

Ocho:

 Okay. So the, the whole school would’ve been like 60 or 70 students?

Molly:

Yeah. Small, very small.  and in the K through six or whatever. Mm-hmm. . 

Ocho:

And then did you have more in high school or, yeah. 

Molly:

Yep. Because all the small elementary schools were combined. We had a Catholic two or three Catholic grade schools, and they all went to the same high school. 

Ocho:

So did you get did you get people pressuring you or anything like that?

Molly:

I feel like, I don’t remember getting a lot of pressure, but I remember my classmates kind of being like, “could you just…? maybe help us out?” But they didn’t, It was kind of like, I, I made it pretty clear, I guess, as a young person, that I just wasn’t gonna consider it. So they didn’t really push it.

Ocho:

Okay. You asserted yourself well enough to where they didn’t they didn’t press the issue. 

Molly:

Yeah, and my family is not into sports, so they didn’t really care if I didn’t.  It was my choice to do what I wanted to do, I guess. 

Ocho:

Did you feel like they needed you? Did you ever feel bad about it or did you, like, was your have mixed emotions about it?

Molly:

I don’t remember feeling bad. Okay. I just remember…I think I was a person of conviction. Like I, if I decided something, I kind of was like, “this isn’t gonna what I’m gonna do,” you can’t change my mind. And so I wouldn’t feel bad because it was just, Like, “why would anyone think I would do it?”

You know what I mean? This is who I am. Yeah. I don’t do sports. 

Ocho:

well, that’s good. 

Molly:

Maybe like a little bit, but not much. 

Ocho:

Yeah. You kind of do ’em on your own turns, but you’re not gonna do it in like this organized way like they’re doing at school. And you if you have to for class or whatever, right?  And then in high school it, it didn’t matter. 

Molly:

In high school you know, you have to play like the sports for, for gym or whatever, but I, yeah, I never signed up even for cheerleading or anything like that, cuz that would be in the sports world. So I did all the artsy things, but never played sports.

Ocho:

And you still do the artsy things now? Yeah. You’re a dancer. 

Molly:

Mm-hmm.  And dance teacher. And you know, a little bit of visual arts and things like that. More for a hobby. 

Ocho:

But the dancing is not a hobby. 

Molly:

No, no. That’s, I have a degree in dance and so I try to do that as much as I can, cuz that’s what I wanted to do going into college and you know, you do all sorts of other jobs to make money, but really my passion is dancing. 

Ocho:

Yeah. And you’re a, a pro, you got a resume and stuff. 

Molly:

I got a resume.  And a degree and all those things. 

Ocho:

Right. That demonstrates athletic ability, I would say. 

Molly:

Yeah. Yeah. Yeah, there’s a lot of, you know, you have to train, quote unquote, or practice and you know, I try to take classes though. It’s kind of hard to do sometimes now with a baby, but… But you know, taking classes and things like that are important to keep growing as a dancer, and you know, I look for opportunities to work with companies and that always kind of makes me think about how I wanna be as an artist too, and things like that.

But, but as far as like, I guess there’s, I never like think of it in terms of “I’m an athlete.” I might be like an athlete, I guess, but I’m not like, I am not an athlete, if that makes any sense. 

Ocho:

It does, I mean, For, for whatever reason, that’s not a sport, I guess, like tap dancing and flamenco, 

Molly:

I’m sure it could be turned into a sport if you really wanted to, because there’s dance sports, obviously, there’s competitive dancing, ballroom dancing, all these things that they actually call “dance sports.”

And I never really got into that. Even in my dance studio experience. I never did competitions. 

Ocho:

Yeah. I don’t know anything about dance sports. How do you feel about the competition aspect? 

Molly:

It wasn’t something I grew up with, and even as a teacher, I kind of have avoided it, even though it’s pretty prevalent in the dance studio world here where I live, and just in general.  I don’t find it very… I can see that there’s benefits to it for some people, but for most, for being an artist, I don’t find it very appealing or helpful because it pushes just maybe a particular look or particular style as like something you have to really do well, but then it’s hard to branch out and really do your own thing. . 

Ocho:

Mm-hmm. So it’s not as open to for creativity or interpretation or something if you’re doing the competitive style. 

Molly:

Yeah. At least from what I can see and tell, yeah. 

Ocho:

I’ve found, like I’ve done some competitive things, very little—cuz I found, I don’t like it—but like, like a battle of the bands or something like that.

Yeah. Yeah. And I, I find I don’t see it that way, I guess. And, and there’s all these TV shows that have, I guess there’s a, there was a dance one too. You think you can dance?

Molly:

So you think you can dance, right? 

Ocho:

Yeah. And there’s TV shows where people compete as singers or whatever, too. I guess I just thought of like, arts as like playing in a sandbox and you don’t really say who’s better than anybody else.

Molly:

You know, I can look at things and say, “I like that more than this other thing.”  But I think that sometimes it’s just my taste or what I’m feeling that in that moment    resonates.  Somehow I see something and it resonates with me. Yeah. And it might not be particularly athletic and I still might really like it or enjoy it.

I think, like I think about an artist that I saw in his name, Jerome Bell, I think is his name.  I saw him live and he did this piece where he just like melted to the ground for an entire song, and that was all he did. And it was very, abstract and sort of…

Ocho:

was it real slow? 

Molly:

Weird, but yeah.

Yeah. But it was just very fascinating and I was like, I’ll never forget that, you know? But there was nothing athletic about it. It’s just like, he’s like, “I’m gonna just slowly go from standing to the ground through this three or four minute song,” and everyone watched him do it. And that was the piece, you know.

Ocho:

And that that caught your attention. You remember it. 

Molly:

I’m like, “that’s cool.” That’s cool that someone can do that on a stage and get paid to do that. 

Ocho:

Oh, it, it sounds great. Like just your description of it, it seems like it would take a lot of patience and focus yeah. And control, 

Molly:

It’s not like he did a bunch of turns or jumps or anything.  So that doesn’t always impress me as an artist.  Necessarily 

Ocho:

the athleticism of it?

Molly:

Yeah. Yeah. Even though it’s interesting.  Sometimes you’ll watch YouTube videos or something will pop up on Facebook and it’s this, you know, amazing performance of this dancer doing these things where you’re like, “how is that even possible?”

And it’s, it is amazing that what people can do. Absolutely. But like, I’m not iinterested in training and doing that myself.  You know.

Ocho:

What are you proud of that you do in your dance? 

Molly:

I think some people comment on that, I’m almost like playing a character when I’m dancing, cuz I use facial expressions, not even on purpose, but I just am expressive.

And sometimes, people, that’s not their taste, but I find a lot of people do like it and that they can connect with that somehow, because it’s not just about fancy moves. It’s kind of like “I could see like something was happening,” you know, or “you’re telling a story” or whatever. So I think that’s something that I do naturally and well, and I’m, you know, some people might say, well, “stop doing things with your face” or whatever, and I don’t know. That’s hard because I just, it’s kind of what I do naturally. And some people enjoy it, and so why stop doing that, I guess, you know? 

Ocho:

Yeah. 

It doesn’t sound like you want to.  Like, it’s what you’re compelled to do sort of naturally, and you’re not really inclined to try to rein it in at all.

Molly:

Mm-hmm. 

Ocho:

Yeah, that makes sense to me. And it sounds like you probably get into it like you’re conveying emotion, that you’re feeling it.  

Molly:

And maybe like I think the other thing that I do well or practice a lot is being rhythmic and musical and things like that. And so that along with being expressive, I guess are my strengths. So I try to play to them as much as I can. 

Ocho:

And you do flamenco and tap? 

Molly:

Mostly, yeah. 

Ocho:

And is that sort of like expressive style characteristic of those dance modes or…? 

Molly:

I don’t think it has to be. It can be, but it’s not…flamingo is, it’s almost like traditionally there’s certain emotions that go with certain things. That’s not to say you can’t play with them, but there’s a mood. A certain piece of music will be a certain style of dance and that will kind of lead to a certain mood to a piece. So it’s hard to go against that grain.

It’s a little bit… There are just traditional things you’ll do. Like one piece will be very serious if you do it to a certain piece of music, and it’s really hard to not do it that way.  

Ocho:

Yeah, like the whole thing. There’s a, there’s a gestalt about it. Like the music creates a mood and the dance creates the, the same mood and they’re working together to create that.

Molly:

And some pieces are really happy, some are really somber. 

Ocho:

Is that what shows on your face then? 

Molly:

I try to. And sometimes I think I take it pretty far and then some people are like, “I just don’t wanna see anything on your face.” And I’m like, “ah. But I think it’s more fun to do that that way.”

Ocho:

So you’ll ham it up a little bit kind of on purpose.

Molly:

Kinda, maybe not on purpose, but I just do. It’s just what I do. 

Ocho:

So back to the athletic thing then. Do you try to stay in shape? Do you have like a fitness routine? Do you have things that you do? 

Molly:

I wish I did. I wish I did. I try to do some yoga, but that’s almost more mindfulness and just kind of feeling like you’re like, I think as a dancer you’re aware of your body more, and so it’s hard to not do something because you feel like poo if you don’t do something, I don’t know… 

Ocho:

if you don’t move. Yeah.

Molly: Mm-hmm. . So I guess a little bit of…I like to think I have some things that I would do, you know, on a regular basis, but I just don’t get to it sometimes. 

Ocho:

Do you got other stuff that you do to move then, when you’re not dancing?

Molly:

Take walks and just try to not sit around all day. 

Ocho:

Yeah. 

Wrestle with your baby. Yeah.  Seems like that. That happens fairly often. Yeah. Playing with the kid.  

Molly:

Yeah. Yeah. Right now, so, yep. That, and prepping for teaching. Running through exercises or creating dances for students, things like that. So yeah  

Ocho:

I suppose when you’re prepared to dance, you are moving.

Molly:

Mm-hmm. . Yeah. 

Ocho:

You’re trying things out 

Molly:

But there’s things I used to do more often that, you know, just putting on a piece of music and moving around. Things like that. It’s to get ideas for things. So 

Ocho:

So you do some of that freestyling. 

Molly:

Yeah. Improvisation. Yeah. 

Ocho:

That’s the only style of dance that I’ll ever do.

I don’t… I have a way of dancing. I don’t dance with people. I don’t have anyone show me any moves. It’s impossible. Like I was in musical theater and it was so hard to just do steps. So like for me, I don’t really pick, I don’t really copy people’s movements very well. So but man, I just love to dance.

If there’s a band playing or if I’m in a club or something, like I’ll just move.  And I kind of look foolish cuz I don’t, there’s no script, you know? Yeah. This isn’t “a dance,” it’s just something, me moving around. But yeah, it feels awesome. So I’m not gonna stop. I’m not gonna try and do it another way.

And that’s like what I’m hearing from you. Like you’re doing it the way really, that feels good to you. 

Molly:

Yeah. I, I take from people, I mean, I try to learn from people who are better than me, and study. And I think there’s always like, things to learn from other people, but ultimately you are you, and you look like yourself.

So I keep that in mind when I’m creating something. 

Ocho:

And that reminds me of what you said about—just going back to the sports—about not doing that. It just really wasn’t you. Like, you know who you are. Yeah. And you don’t do.  

Molly:

Balls. I don’t know. Balls always scared me. . 

Ocho:

Oh, okay. 

Molly:

Like, yeah, throw basketball at me.  And I’d be like, “no!” 

Ocho:

Yeah. That’s a projectile. . 

Molly:

Why would I wanna catch that? That’s terrifying. 

Ocho:

Stop it. 

So there’s something to that too. There’s, there’s something about maybe the, the chaos of it, or the, the props involved maybe. 

Molly:

Yeah, like, I think the, the least…I feel like, birdies, when you play badminton, that’s about as fast as I want a ball to come in my direction. . 

Ocho:

Yeah. You know what’s interesting is like, I was totally with you. I mean, cuz truthfully, I don’t even go bowling or play pool or I wouldn’t even do any of that. II wouldn’t play horseshoes. I’d just be like, “have fun” and I would watch and hang out.

But I’m, I’m totally not into it. So I was like, I could really relate, but one thing I will do is play badminton though. 

Molly:

Well, yeah, so we can play badminton. I guess.  

Ocho:

we should do that cuz like, it would be such a rare event that we both played a sport, 

Molly:

but like not keep score, you know what I mean?

Ocho:

I do know what you mean. That’s totally how I would do it. Yeah. 

Molly:

Just hit it like maybe, or maybe not. 

Ocho:

You just sort of play with, with the birdie and the, yeah, racket

Molly:

and the like, just watch it and see what happens. I don’t know. . Yeah. Yeah. It could be an art piece. . 

Ocho:

It is an art piece. It’s, it’s such a, it’s such a fun thing to watch that birdie.

Just like, cuz it’s weighted on one end. It’s funny looking. 

Molly:

But other, I don’t know. I like to ice skate. Okay. But I never played hockey, you know, like I think it’s pretty to watch figure skaters, but I’m…and I think it’s interesting that the competition aspect of it pushes people to do crazy sh—, crazy stuff, you know?

Yeah, yeah, yeah. 

Molly:

But but I think it’s just fascinating to watch as an art. I don’t really care who wins or loses . 

Ocho:

Right, right. Yeah. I guess I’d feel the same.  Not really into figure skating, but it is, it is really mesmerizing to watch Yeah. And, and I hear you about the competition aspect. That takes hold.

I don’t really participate in competitions, but you know, like I would host them.  Like I put on events and I see that as a draw. People are drawn to competition and it creates an excitement among audiences and stuff. Yeah. 

Molly:

Yeah, I can see why people would watch sports. I just don’t really get into it.

Ocho:

Yeah. And so you don’t, you don’t follow any professional sports or anything? No. Does that ever put you on the outside? 

Molly:

I guess I hang out with artists, so and you know, we do that together and my family doesn’t really follow sports. So, you know, the family side of it, I don’t really…I think my husband’s family will watch football and Thanksgiving and I’m kind of like,” okay, whatever.”

You know, “gonna watch football…”

Ocho:

Does he like football too? 

Molly:

Chase, my husband? Yeah. He would watch a game if it’s on, but we don’t put it on at home. 

Ocho:

Right. He’s, he is not like he has to watch it or…Looking forward to it all week or something. 

Molly:

No. 

Ocho:

Yeah. Yeah. . Yeah. It’s, it’s funny to me, I thought I’d be sort of sports proof, just being an artist and a musician, but there’s so many musicians that I know that wanna watch the football game, and there’s a guy who’s not gonna make it to practice on Sunday, you know?

Yeah, it’s it’s not anything I can even get mad about anymore. I just have to accept it, you know, or be confused by, or whatever. It’s, it’s just, it’s par for the course. To use a sports term. 

Molly:

So, yeah, I think that it’s almost on par with religion for some people, which is another thing that I find interesting.

Cause, you know,  they have that time where they’re gonna watch their football and like, “you better not,” it’s like church . 

Ocho:

Yeah, 

There’s some, there’s something sacred about it,  something that they hold dear. It’s, it’s interesting. I, I compare politics to sports a lot, like American politics in particular, kind of the competitive team-oriented view of it.

Molly:

Yeah. Luckily sports doesn’t have to necessarily affect my day, my life. 

Ocho:

Yeah. They’re  Those guys aren’t making the rules. 

Molly:

Yeah. And I don’t have to vote for them or anything, so I don’t really care what they do as long as I don’t have to like pay for it, you know? 

Ocho:

But it is like voting and cheering are like very similar things and people end up cheering for who they vote for and so on. 

Molly:

Politics has become more like sports, that’s for sure. , 

Ocho:

It has, since I’ve been alive.  It used to be a very dry affair, and now it’s all kinds of crazy exciting.  

Molly:

super exciting. Yeah. I guess I check on the results.

Yeah. You know, just like I would check on the sports scores perhaps, but yeah. Maybe not obsessively. 

Ocho:

Yeah. Well, and there’s a difference between just wanting to know the score and being really caught up in the game.  It’s like, “who won? Okay, I’m good.” Whatever. Move on. Well, do you feel like you’re missing anything?  Not being part of the sports world? 

Molly:

I don’t feel like I’m missing anything. I never felt like I was missing out.

Ocho:

Is there anything that, if you could, like take part of the sports world, that that is not in your life and you could get that without actually having to be part of the sports world?

Molly:

Hmm. I don’t know.  

Ocho:

like maybe the drive or the camaraderie or. Something like that. 

Molly:

Like I get that from theater. You know? So I don’t feel like I miss out on that.  and maybe like making money?

Ocho:

Oh yeah. 

Molly:

That would be the only thing. I don’t know if athletes really make that much. Most of them, like, maybe the few do, but I wonder if I would make more money if I was, you know, an athlete instead of dancer, but, 

Ocho:

Yeah.

You know, even if athletes don’t necessarily make money, sports makes money. Yeah. That was something that took me…like one of my college professors sort of went on a rant. He was a ranty guy, but he said like, he’s like, “yeah, people want money for the arts. But the arts don’t make any money”

And he is like, “what what makes money is the sports. And that’s why the, the money goes to the sports. That’s why people get scholarships for sports. Because the sports are what makes money.” People buy tickets and they sit in those bleachers and the people go to the theaters too, but they’re.  And there’s not a huge, it’s not a huge place.

Molly:

Yeah.  I participate in—or at least I tried to, in the past, participate in—Arts Advocacy Day at the Capitol. And I think there’s actually a lot of argument to say that arts does make money. Like there’s a lot of capital in the arts in our state. We just don’t think about it much.

There are a lot of theaters actually, you know? There are a lot of theaters downtown. That bring in music acts and all sorts of stuff and 

Ocho:

Yep. Or comedy or something like that. Mm-hmm.  like yeah. 

Molly:

And there’s people who make things and you know, there’s a lot of small things that add up to a lot of money, you know, if you look at enough, which, they have all sorts of information out there on that to advocate at the capitol and tell our legislators like, “actually, look how much money is in the arts and in our state.” So I feel like…

Ocho:

it wouldn’t be the first thing that my college professor was wrong about.  That guy was wrong about some things. 

Molly:

Yeah.  Sometimes, you know, you don’t make a lot of money cuz you do other things, but a lot of people make a little bit of money doing art.  If that makes any sense. 

Ocho:

Yeah. I mean, I’ve made my living for the, the past 12, 13 years as an entertainer.

It’ll be 14 years this year. So, just as an artist and an entertainer doing music either performance or production or. whatever.  And yeah, you can do it. . . Right. Could I, playing sports in my mid forties? [laughs] 

Molly:

Yes. Yeah. Then you have to do something else. 

Ocho:

Right, right. Well, did you have anything else you wanted to add?

I think it’s been a great conversation. 

Molly:

William, what do you think? [baby coos] Yeah, I know. 

I think that if sports weren’t such a strong thing in our culture, it wouldn’t be a weird thing to say, like, “I don’t do sports,” you know? Right. But it is such a like big thing in our, I guess in our world.

Mm-hmm. , but you know, in American culture there’s certain things that, it’s kind of almost expectation that you have some involvement in it because it’s kind of everywhere.  Tt’s pervasive.  And so, yeah, even artists, friends, like you said, that I know, some of my artist friends follow certain kinds of sports and it’s interesting to me when they can do both things because, I don’t know, they seem contradictory to me, but that’s just me. That’s just my opinion, I guess. 

Ocho:

They do to me too, but I, I get that they’re not.  And it does seem that sports is part of the world and like, you know, I studied anthropology too, and it seems as though like it’s just always been, and it’s everywhere.

Like in some capacity there’s sports but also maybe particularly here that it’s part of an American identity. Yeah, I hear that. Cuz you, you hear like, you know, the classic American identity is like “mom and baseball, and apple pie,” right? Like yeah. Those three things, I think, you hear mm-hmm. . So I’m not so sure how up to date that is, but… 

Molly:

I don’t either.

Ocho:

Yeah. But, but as, as a classic like American identity, a sport is involved in there and I don’t know if, if all Nations would do that necessarily. 

Molly:

Yeah, I would say a lot do, but the sport maybe is different anywhere you go, cuz you know, some places it’s football, soccer, whatever, you know.

But it’s like a part of your identity of where you live. 

Ocho:

And there’s a lot of people getting worked up. Like I find like that I can fall asleep during a football game, because so little happens. 

Molly:

It’s like baseball’s even worse though. 

Ocho:

I know, I know. 

Molly:

And golf is like, even, even worse.

Ocho:

Oh yeah. 

the golf game is on all day. And like, 

Molly:

And you know, my husband and I, we talk about like, “oh, what if William gets into sports or whatever.” And there’s certain things that I would be totally like fine with him doing, but like if he wanted to play football, I just don’t know how I would feel about it.

I’m not sure exactly how I’d approach that, but I just really hope he doesn’t, cuz I just don’t have to sit through football games, A) and it’s kind of like a scary sport for young people to play. 

Ocho:

They get hurt. Yeah. Well, and old people can’t play it.

Right. We, we’d really get hurt. 

Molly:

Right. 

Ocho:

So yeah. It’s, that’s, that’s interesting because there, you know, there’s some parents, all they want is for their kids to play football, right? Yeah. Be a football star. “Had a boy. Oh, right. He can be a football star now.”

Molly:

Yeah, yeah. Yeah.  I hope not.

Ocho:

I do know that, that kids tend to, in some way, they tend to leave their parents’ habits in some way. They tend to divert from what the parents do. 

Molly:

sometimes. 

Ocho:

Yeah. Not in all ways, but in, in one way or another. They sort of become independent and a lot of that’s just through some kind of habit or activity.  So we might sooner or later have William on the show saying, “I don’t do that.  My parents do it, but I don’t.”

Molly:

Right.  

Ocho:

whatever it might be. 

Molly:

We’ll see what he wants to do. He’s really into his ukulele, so we’re encouraging his ukulele playing. 

Ocho:

Yeah. He might just follow in your footsteps and just be another pea in the pod. Yeah. Who knows? Yeah. Well, it’s great talking to you.

Yeah, thank you very much. 

Molly:

You’re welcome.  William, can you say thank you?

[William coos]

Thank you William.  Listeners can find Molly on stage with the Flying Foot Forum at Park Square Theater in Minneapolis, MN, USA in April, 2023.  

My name is Ocho.  I’m your host, chief engineer and producer. I also composed and performed the theme song.  If you or someone you know would like to be a guest on this show, apply today at ochotunes.com/guest.  Shout out to long-time contributor, Aron Nevin who has interviewed me for my first, members-only segment “Ocho Doesn’t Stream His Music.”  You will be able to hear all about that soon at idontdothatpodcast.com/give.  Thanks to Braden Saulsbury for the background music for this episode.  Thanks to our sponsor, Prime Time Web, to our guests, Molly and William, and thanks to you for all you do and all you don’t do.  I’ll talk to you again if I’m lucky.

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